Fun, Fearless & Glamourous

Just a single girl who has trouble parting ways with her magazines because they have given her some great advice over the past 6 years.

I just want to share with you some of that advice Glamour & Cosmo has given me.

Submissions are always welcomed.

All post material is copyrighted by its respective owners unless otherwise stated. This blog does not claim ownership for any of the materials listed or posted here.
Also, because this is a secondary blog I will not be able to follow back.

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Why Channing Tatum Has an X-Rated Doll Collection

Everyone’s favorite handsome goofball, 33, called us from London to talk about his new movie, the sweet secret behind his happy marriage, and the X-rated dolls his friends send him (um, what?).

BY ERIKA BERLIN

Q: You’re kicking ass and taking names in White House Down [out June 28]. What made you pick this film?
A: Most movies like this are about other countries attacking America, but this one is a little more unique because the enemy’s coming from the inside. Jamie Foxx [who plays the president] is wickedly smart and strong, not unlike our president now. I believe Obama is a lot of fun when he’s not trying to keep our economy together.

Q: You and Jenna [Dewan-Tatum, his wife] have been together for nearly eight years. What’s your secret?
A: You have to want it. Jenna’s and my thing is checking in with each other all the time, like “On a scale from 1 to 10, how much do you love me right now?” And you gotta be honest, and you’ve got to want an honest answer. I told a friend to do that. He asked the question and it turned into a huge fight, and I’m like, that’s kind of the point. Obviously, something needed to be fixed, he needed to be aware of it, and she needed to get it off her chest.

Q: You seem like one of the most approachable celebrities around. Why is that?
A: It’s a hard thing for me to wrap my mind around the C word: celebrity. Rock stars are celebrities, because they’re larger than life. As an actor, you have to play the everyman and the everygirl. If you start treating people in the real world like assistants, that’s not a good look. But my friends keep me grounded. It’s embarrassing to tell you how much my friends make fun of me. Seriously, when you have a doll made of your face, it’s ridiculous how creative your friends can get…pictures, videos, little animated cartoons that they’ve made. And they’re way, way not PG-13. So I get chopped down to size all the time.

Q: Fill in the blank: No one would think I was sexy if they knew_______.
A: I’m a fat kid on the inside. I love food so much, and I fluctuate about 25 to 30 pounds between movies. I feel like I have to do a chess movie that requires very little movement at some point, just so I can eat pizza and play chess on the beach all day. And then eat more pizza and cheese-burgers and drink beer. That’d be amazing. I’d give anything for that. I gotta figure that movie out.

Why Channing Tatum Has an X-Rated Doll Collection

Everyone’s favorite handsome goofball, 33, called us from London to talk about his new movie, the sweet secret behind his happy marriage, and the X-rated dolls his friends send him (um, what?).

BY ERIKA BERLIN

Q: You’re kicking ass and taking names in White House Down [out June 28]. What made you pick this film?

A: Most movies like this are about other countries attacking America, but this one is a little more unique because the enemy’s coming from the inside. Jamie Foxx [who plays the president] is wickedly smart and strong, not unlike our president now. I believe Obama is a lot of fun when he’s not trying to keep our economy together.

Q: You and Jenna [Dewan-Tatum, his wife] have been together for nearly eight years. What’s your secret?

A: You have to want it. Jenna’s and my thing is checking in with each other all the time, like “On a scale from 1 to 10, how much do you love me right now?” And you gotta be honest, and you’ve got to want an honest answer. I told a friend to do that. He asked the question and it turned into a huge fight, and I’m like, that’s kind of the point. Obviously, something needed to be fixed, he needed to be aware of it, and she needed to get it off her chest.

Q: You seem like one of the most approachable celebrities around. Why is that?

A: It’s a hard thing for me to wrap my mind around the C word: celebrity. Rock stars are celebrities, because they’re larger than life. As an actor, you have to play the everyman and the everygirl. If you start treating people in the real world like assistants, that’s not a good look. But my friends keep me grounded. It’s embarrassing to tell you how much my friends make fun of me. Seriously, when you have a doll made of your face, it’s ridiculous how creative your friends can get…pictures, videos, little animated cartoons that they’ve made. And they’re way, way not PG-13. So I get chopped down to size all the time.

Q: Fill in the blank: No one would think I was sexy if they knew_______.

A: I’m a fat kid on the inside. I love food so much, and I fluctuate about 25 to 30 pounds between movies. I feel like I have to do a chess movie that requires very little movement at some point, just so I can eat pizza and play chess on the beach all day. And then eat more pizza and cheese-burgers and drink beer. That’d be amazing. I’d give anything for that. I gotta figure that movie out.

Community's Joel McHale Dishes Out His Guilty Pleasures

February 7, 2013 will forever be marked as the day Community finally returned (tonight at 8 p.m. ET on NBC—don’t forget!). So to celebrate this momentous occasion, funny guy Joel McHale shared hisversion of Glamour's signature guilt-free zone, Hey, It’s OK!. And if these guilty pleasures are good enough for Joel, they’re good enough for our guys… we think.

Hey, It’s OK…

…to cry at movies, but only Field of DreamsE.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, and Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol.

…for a man to get a mani-pedi. Just remember to pick a shade that matches your handbag.

…to ask for assistance in grabbing hard-to-reach items on the top shelf at the grocery store.

…to ask your server for a wine pairing suggestion, as long as you aren’t at Outback Steakhouse.

…for a man to sit down while he pees. You’ve had a long day, champ!

…to consider 50 Shades of Grey a comedy.

Um, Not OK…

…to lie. Unless, of course, you’re at a job interview, on a first date, or the star witness in a criminal trial.

…to consider your role as pallbearer a part of the week’s aerobic exercise.

…to smoke a cigarette while wearing jewelry and a track suit.

…to tell people you don’t have a TV, but are up-to-date on what happens on Here Comes Honey Boo Boo.

… to think that calorie counting is evvver-so-sightly annoying in a man.

… if your perfect-eight hours of sleep is more like nine and a half. Ten on the weekends.

… if the closest you have come to doing a juice cleanse is googling juice cleanse.

… to still be listening to your favourite bands from high school while working at your very grown-up job.

… if you refuse to say anything but “small,” “medium,” and “large” when ordering at Starbucks. They know what you mean.

… to ask all your friends for advice and then do exactly the opposite. - @Mandi4u2c, via Twitter.

… to judge a guy by his ring tone, “You’re sexy and you know it? Oh, really?

UM, NOT OK…

… to keep promising (and cancelling) a hangout with a friend. It may be no big deal to you, but someone else is bummed.

You Survived Monday, So You Deserve a Look at This Insanely Hot New Diet Coke Hunk!

Thanks Diet Coke, from remembering that nothing goes better with our afternoon dose of icy cold and sugar free caffeine than a really really really ridiculously good looking guy pulling off his soda-soaked shirt—in an equally ridiculous 60-second plot line that involves a group of ogling women rolling him a soda that explodes in his face (uh, no comment on that innuendo). Diet Coke has brought back their tradition of featuring a “hunk” in their commercials, and they picked such a good one, I’m not even mad that I’ve been forced to use the awful word “hunk” three times in the last 30 seconds.

Feeling better about facing the rest of the week? I thought so. You guys, that dude is as hot as the Etta James song playing in the background. Which is very hot. And we didn’t even hear hims speak yet, which FYI—he’s a British model named Andrew Cooper, in case you’re interested. He apparently attempted to have a singing career in the 90s, but I think he has found his true calling as a person who never ever ever ever wears shirts.

Is this commercial stupid, hot, or so stupidly hot you need a Diet Coke to cool off? I think a combo of all three.

Throw the Ultimate Girls Viewing Party

If you could take Girls and translate it into food, you would end up with this: a comforting, shameless pile of grilled cheese sandwiches, cupcakes, cereal milk, cheesy poppers, and homemade pickles. We’ve rounded up N.Y.C.’s most delicious bites for you to cook up while you devour the new season of the HBO show, which returns on Sunday, Jan. 13.

Quick Cucumber Pickles

What emboies the homemade New York City hipster spirit better than a D.I.Y. pickle? Throw together these super-fast cukes.

1 cup Diamond Crystal kosher salt1 cup sugar2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper4 teaspoons ground coriander1 garlic clove, grated1/2 English cucumber (about 8 ounces), skin on, sliced very thin, ideally on a mandoline

Mix the dry ingredients in a bowl. Toss the cucumber with 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon of the spice mixture (save the rest; it will keep for months at room temperature). Let sit 10 minutes before serving.

Makes 8 ounces or 4 servings.

Excerpted from The Mile End Cookbook by Noah Bernamoff and Rae Bernamoff.

B&G Poppers

Just trust us: This spin on the jalapeño popper, dreamed up by N.Y.C.’s Parm restaurant, will be gone the second you put out the plate.

For the filling:5 ounces cooked jasmine rice8 ounces sharp provolone cheese, grated4 ounces cream cheese4 ounces bechamel sauce (recipe below)4 ounces B&G pickled cherry peppers (seeds and stems removed), finely chopped4 ounces white onion, small dicedOlive oil for cookingCanola oil for fryingSalt and pepperThousand island sauce (recipe below), for dipping

In a large saute pan, heat up two ounces of olive oil on medium-high heat. Add onions and saute until golden (about five minutes). Season with salt and pepper, and let cool. Combine all ingredients in a bowl and mix thoroughly with your hands. (The filling should be evenly mixed and smooth.)

For the bechamel sauce:1 ounce butter1 ounce flour4 ounces whole milkFresh nutmeg

In a small sauce pot, melt butter and flour together. Whisk in the milk until smooth. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to low. Simmer for 20 minutes, stirring constantly.Season with salt and pepper and freshly grated nutmeg. Cool completely.

For the thousand island sauce:2 ounces crushed tomatoes2 ounces mayonnaise2 ounces agro dolce (bring 2 oz sugar and 2 oz red wine vinegar to a boil in small sauce pan, reduce by half then completely cool)1 ounce half sour pickles, finely diced

Mix all ingredients in a small bowl.

To assemple the poppers:10 B&G pepperoncini peppers, seeds and stems removed4 ounces dark beer4 ounces flour8 ounces panko breadcrumbs, finely ground

• Fill each pepperoncini with 1 1/2 tablespoons of filling. Cut each filled pepper in half and trim the ends.• Whisk the flour and beer together to form a smooth batter.• Dip each pepperoncini piece in the batter, then roll in the panko crumbs. Place on parchment paper.• Fry the poppers in 350-degree canola oil until golden brown, about 1 1/2 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and serve immediately with the thousand island dressing as dipping sauce.

Makes 10 poppers.

Cereal Milk

“Anyone who’s ever spent a lazy Saturday morning drowning in holey sweatpants, watching hour after hour of USA reruns, knows the flavor,” writes chef Christina Tosi in the Momofuku Milk Bar cookbook.

2 3/4 cups cornflakes
3 3/4 cups cold milk
2 tablespoons tightly packed light brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

• Heat the oven to 300 degrees F.
• Spread the cornflakes on a parchment-lined sheet pan. Bake for 15 minutes, until lightly toasted. Cool completely. (Note: Toasting the cornflakes before steeping them deepens the flavor of the milk. Taste your cereal milk after you make it. If you want it a little sweeter, don’t be shy; add a little more brown sugar. If you want a more mellow cereal milk, add a splash of fresh milk and a pinch of salt.)
• Transfer the cooled cornflakes to a large pitcher. Pour the milk into the pitcher and stir vigorously. Let steep for 20 minutes at room temperature.
• Strain the mixture through a fine-mesh sieve, collecting the milk in a medium bowl. The milk will drain off quickly at first, then become thicker and starchy toward the end of the straining process. Using the back of a ladle (or your hand), wring the milk out of the cornflakes, but do not force the mushy cornflakes through the sieve.
• Whisk the brown sugar and salt into the milk until fully dissolved. Store in a clean pitcher or glass milk jug, refrigerated, for up to 1 week.

Makes 2 1/2 cups. Serves 4.

Grilled Cheese Bites with Caramelized Apples

In New York City, Keith Klein’s popular Milk Truck serves up the kind of gooey goodness that takes everyone to a happy place—but especially girls. “Women respond much more strongly to grilled cheese,” Klein says.

3 Granny Smith apples3 tablespoons sugar3 tablespoons salt6 tablespoons butter12 slices rosemary pullman bread6 ounces Gruyere6 ounces aged cheddar3 ounces blue cheese

For the caramelized apples

• Peel and core the apples, then cut in 1/8-inch slices. Toss them with sugar and salt in a bowl.• Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add the butter. When the butter has melted, place the apple slices in a single layer on the skillet. Cook until the edges begin to brown, then turn to caramelize the other side. Remove from pan, and let cool.

For the sandwiches

• Heat a panini maker, or the best skillet you have, over medium heat.• Spread a thin layer of butter on one side of each bread slice. Add 1 ounce each of the Gruyere and cheddar cheeses, and 1Ž2 ounce of blue cheese to the unbuttered sides of six slices. Top with two apple slices per slice of bread. Top with the remaining bread, buttered sides out.• Place sandwiches in the panini maker or on the skillet, and cook until bread is crisp and cheese is melted throughout, about 4 minutes. If using a skillet, place another, slightly smaller pan on top of the sandwiches to weigh them down. Turn sandwiches after 2 minutes, and brown the other side. Cut each sandwich into quarters, and serve while still hot.

Makes 24 bite-size sandwiches.

Mini Peanut Butter, Banana, and Honey Cupcakes 

What could be more Hannah than a cupcake from Brooklyn? The duo behind Butter & Scotch, a dessert and cocktail bar, shared this recipe for their mini cupcakes—they’re the perfect size for having more than one! Bonus points for eating them in your tub. 

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter3 eggs1 very ripe banana1/3 cup light brown sugar1/3 cup white sugar1 3/4 cups all purpose flour1/2 teaspoon salt1 teaspoon baking powder1 teaspoon vanilla extractPeanut butter frosting (recipe below)Honey

• Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.• Start by melting butter in a small pan and set aside. Mix all dry ingredients in a medium bowl and set aside. Put sugar in the bowl of a mixer and add melted butter. Beat on medium high until the butter has cooled slightly. Add vanilla, eggs, and banana and beat until completely incorporated.• Turn mixer to low and add the flour mixture. Mix until completely incorporated and no lumps remain (do not turn mixer to a higher speed during this time or it will make the cupcakes tough when baked).• Line mini cupcake pans with cupcake liners. Fill the liners up about three-quarters of the way full. Bake for about 9-10 minutes or until the top of the cupcake is firm to the touch.• Let cupcakes cool completely and top them with a blob of peanut butter frosting (below) and a dab of honey. Enjoy!

Makes 36 mini cupcakes.

Peanut Butter Frosting

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, at room temperature1/2 pound cream cheese, at room temperature1 teaspoon vanilla extract1/2 teaspoon salt1 pound powdered sugar1/4 cup your favorite smooth peanut butter

Cream butter in the bowl of a mixer until totally smooth. With the mixer on, add cream cheese to the bowl, a little at a time, until totally incorporated. Add vanilla, peanut butter, and salt. Turn mixer to lowest speed and slowly add powdered sugar. Mix until incorporated and use!

You do not need to be anorexic to be successful in Hollywood
Zooey Deschanel

Stop the Bitch Wars!

From cyberbullying to sorority hazing to The Real Housewives, women are putting one another down like never before. Here’s what you can do to retire the gloves for good.

Not long ago, I was hanging out with a few women I didn’t know that well. We were sputtering along making small talk. But when The Real Housewives came up, it was as though our conversation finally found gasoline and a match. We gleefully shredded those women—and, later, the women of The Bachelor and The Millionaire Matchmaker—for nearly an hour, which proves at least two truths about gossip: People are still the most fascinating subjects on the planet, and you should never underestimate the bonding power of tearing other women down.

I don’t need a psychology degree to tell you that this is borne partly of insecurity, from the fear that we ourselves are failing in some way to be beautiful, to be successful, to buy the right low-waist jeans. But getting high off the fumes of our sisters’ misfortunes is a cheap buzz, and it feels like we’re all a little too drunk on it these days. The bitching is out of control! Sororities—that bastion of Southern politesse—have seen an increase in verbal abuse and even violence in hazing rituals. Mommy blogs regularly devolve into all-caps throw-downs over everything from breast-feeding to baby slings. ANew York Times story reported bullying is trickling down to younger girls—one survey found that nearly half of the third-graders in a Massachusetts school had been bullied.

Of course we have more tools for cruelty than ever before, thanks to Facebook and the Internet, home to knee-jerk reactions of all ages. Seven years after Tina Fey turned “mean girls” into a household phrase in her classic movie—putting the lie to the notion that women are all sparkles and sunshine—bitchiness is more ubiquitous than ever. We have met the mean girls, and they are sometimes us.

“Is this a new trend? I wouldn’t say that,” says Kelly Valen, a lawyer who turned her own searing tale of betrayal at the hands of her sorority sisters into the book The Twisted Sisterhood: Unraveling the Dark Legacy of Female Friendships. “But the behaviors seem to be absolutely more accepted—even expected—and we have become more complacent about it all.”

Personally, as a Texan who occasionally suffered under the oppression of “smile and act nice,” I can understand the allure of the bedazzled ms. bitch T-shirt. There’s a kicky thrill to nasty behavior, in which confidence gets swapped out for nastiness. But the problem is one of proportion and volume. And if you look at our culture right now, we are seriously out of whack.

Watched any reality TV lately? “Ten years of reality programming has eliminated virtually all traces of strong female friendships,” says Jennifer Pozner, media critic and author of the book Reality Bites Back: The Troubling Truth About Guilty Pleasure TV. Shows like The Real Housewives and Bad Girls Club portray women as shrieking harpies who love nothing more than to plant their manicures in one another’s hair and torpedo the reputation of whichever comely lass just exited the room. What’s shocking about reality TV is that, for a genre so ingenious and vast that it can encompass both The Biggest Loser and Ice Road Truckers, its depiction of women is painfully narrow. From the romance of The Bachelor to the grotesquerie of Bridalplasty, it’s all “men, handbags, Prada—this catfight is on!”

Which doesn’t mean I don’t watch those shows. They are masterfully engineered to tap into our earliest childhood fantasies about money and fame, while allowing our snarky adult selves to sneer in judgment: Those dumb bitches. Ditto the tabloids, where one simple divorce can be spun into a seven-year cautionary tale about Other Women. Jen vs. Angelina: the Ulysses of girl-on-girl crime.

It’s hard not to mourn the glory days of Buffy and Xena, shows that understood how female friendships could be as inspiring and complex as any romance. These days we’ve traded the plucky sisterhood of Gilmore Girls for the slick villainy of Gossip Girl. Even the best hits on TV (GleeModern Family) thrive on friction between women. (Meanwhile, tween shows like iCarly too often mistake sarcasm for self-expression.) And for every one of Taylor Swift’s nice-girl ballads, we also get lyrics like this: “Tell them bitches get a stick/I’m done leadin’ the blind,” courtesy of popular female rapper Nicki Minaj.

Me, I avoid confrontation. The only catfight I’ve been involved with ended in an exorbitant vet bill. But I am guilty of mainlining pop-culture misogyny, and thinking that it doesn’t affect my attitude toward other women is kind of like consuming a Quarter Pounder at every meal and hoping I don’t get fat. Bitchiness is not attractive—not to men, and certainly not to other women. What is attractive is the confidence to swing your hips as you walk into a room, knowing that another woman’s beauty does not diminish your own. Listen, it helps to have a rockin’ bod and chic clothes. I get it. But when it comes to seduction, a spark of generosity and the inner glow of healthy self-esteem trump snarkiness every time. By putting others down, you end up looking insecure. And no guy wants to date someone who’s cruel.

“Part of me thinks girls and women need a big shake-by-the-shoulders wake-up call,” Valen says, “a reminder that none of this serves us well—individually or as a gender.” On a recent episode of The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills, yet another dinner party dissolved into a name-calling spat. “We’re not doing this anymore,” Taylor Armstrong said, throwing up her manicured hands in a sign of surrender. “These are not the ladies that we are. Enough.”

Of course, by the finale, they were all fighting again. They’re on contract, after all. But we can do what they can’t: We can cut it out.

  • Here are five steps you can take to end bitch culture.

1. Challenge yourself to be honest about what you think rather than putting on a phony face and whispering behind someone’s back later. Think someone looks awful in that dress? Don’t say she looks great, then turn around and roll your eyes. Furious that someone made you wait? Don’t say it’s “no problem.” Dare to disagree, to tell the truth about how you feel in a mature way rather than relying on squinty adolescent aggression or silent martyrdom. Maybe you won’t feel the need for the pressure-valve release of gossip if you give voice to your own opinions.

2. Understand that success is not a zero-sum game. Because the space for women in the workplace has traditionally been so narrow, it’s easy to fall into the trap of thinking that one woman’s triumph is another’s failure. But we’re not competitors; we’re collaborators. Anna, 28, was locked in a petty feud with a female coworker. Both threatened by the other, they knocked each other’s ideas in meetings and “forgot” to invite each other to after-work get-togethers. Then half the staff was fired, work grew dark—and they realized they were actually in this together. “We really did become friendlier, sharing ideas and asking each other’s opinions and encouraging each other as we both searched for—and finally got—new jobs,” Anna says.

3. Stop doing the things that feed your own worst ideas about yourself. Maybe it’s watching The Real Housewives. Maybe it’s lurking on Facebook out of envy and spite while eating fried sausage cheese. Whatever is making you feel bitter, resentful or “less than” in some way, cut it out. Seek out activities that build your self-esteem, not ones that strangle it. Being kinder to yourself will help you be kinder to other people.

4. Before you tear another woman down, use this simple trick: Imagine what that slight would sound like coming out of the mouth of your daughter, your favorite niece or any young girl who is dear to you. Because if you keep it up, that’s exactly what’s going to happen.

5. Have a problem with another woman? Be adult and handle it with respect and dignity the timeless, old-school way: Talk to her.

Sarah Hepola is the culture editor at salon.com.

1. A statement bag, even if the statement is “Who cares about statement bags?”

2. A Teen Mom marathon on the day you’re home with a fever.

3. At least one person you can call at 3:28am.

4. More than one square foot of space on any form of public transportation.

5. Love you can feel, even from 1,000 miles away.

6. A few days a year filled with flip-flops, tropical sunsets and the sound of steel drums.

7. Fresh flowers once a week. Self-picked dandelions count.

8. The shinier hair, thicker lashes or plumper lips you just shelled out $12.99 for.

9. Orgasms on demand, sans or avec partner.

10. A say in whether and when you become a mother.

11. One pet (yours or someone else’s) who has a special thing for your lap.

12. A truly excellent profile picture. 


  1. The friend who won’t let you be less than your best, even if you sometimes want to kick her.
  2. The friend who’s spent the holidays with your parents, gotten drunk with your brother and lived through the dog-spaying incident of ‘92. She’sfamily
  3. The personal comedian, so hilarious that you dare not call her while driving.
  4. The friend who’s a little bit evil—so entertaining!
  5. A rich friend who will always buy you dinner.
  6. A poor friend who’ll let you buy hers.
  7. The work friend: listener, knower of backstory, saver of sanity.
  8. The friend who you can’t wait to be Golden Girls with.
  9. The neighbor who’ll lend you her drill—or a pair of red stilletos.
  10. The friend who drags out of you all the sexual details you’re secretly dying to share.
  11. The friend who rafts the Amazon, gets a pet snake and does speed dating—so you don’t have to.
  12. The friend who, instead of asking how she can help, just shows up and does.

The male stars of the hit ABC show Happy Endings—Damon Wayans Jr., Zach Knighton, and Adam Pally—answer all your puzzling male-behavior questions. In detail!

Why are guys so afraid of the phone? What’s up with texting only? —Caitlin, 25
DAMON: It’s just easier. 
ZACH: It’s more efficient. 
ADAM: I hate getting a voice mail. I’m not going to listen to your message so I can hear what you’re about to tell me when I call you back. I mean, when you’re starting to date, you’re on the phone; you put your best foot forward. But if a guy is only texting you, that doesn’t mean he doesn’t like you. 
DAMON: Unless there’s a top-out to the number of words. If he just says, “Hey,” “OK,” “Yeah,” “You up?”—no good. Just say, “I’d rather you call me.” If he likes you, he’ll adjust.

Is my husband thinking of me when he’s masturbating? And when does he even have time to? —Julie, 38
ZACH: There’s always time. 
ADAM: I’ve had the flu, with a 105-degree fever, and I’ve said to my wife, “Can you please go out for cough syrup?” And when she did, I jerked off. Twice. Do I think of my wife? Most of the time, no. Sometimes, yes. But, really, no. 
DAMON: No. Unless you haven’t seen her for a long time, you’re not going to “use” her. 
ADAM: And you have to masturbate. If I couldn’t, I’d be, like, a crazy person with a machete. 
DAMON: And an erection. A machete and a boner. 
ADAM: Not good.

The men I work with are always bonding over “dude things.” Do I have to learn to love beer and baseball to get ahead? —Jen, 36
ADAM: Do you work at the Mad Men firm? Quit! 
DAMON: Or just educate yourself on the basics. 
ZACH: But guys can sniff out a phony: “Oh, that was a great punt in that Vikings game, wasn’t it, guys?” 
ADAM: There’s a misconception that men want women to throw on a jersey and watch the game. I don’t need you to talk about sports with me, and I’d rather you didn’t force it.

I just had a baby. What’s he expecting from the first time we have sex again? —Rachel, 31
ADAM: My wife and I have a kid, and I’ve found that sex changes for a while when you’ve just had a baby, and then it comes back. And it’ll be different, but it’ll be fun. And you just have to do it. 
ZACH: After my wife had the baby, we had to work our way toward the rhythm that we were in before. It’s like spring training—you’re warming up, you’re getting ready for the season, easing your way back into it. But no matter what, it’s going to be fun for the guy. He hasn’t gotten laid in months.

I’ve been seeing a guy who wants to hang out one second, then blows me off the next. What should I do? —Louise, 22 
ADAM: Uh-oh. She’s slept with him. That’s what “hung out” means: Sex was involved. 
DAMON: This is so over. Women have the power before the sex happens. Think about how many things a guy does just to get to have sex. He will do anything. 
ADAM: Every day, every guy, from when he wakes up to when he goes to sleep, is thinking, How can I get laid? 
DAMON: So, Louise, if it’s not too late, withhold, keep it sacred until he starts acting right. Say, “Look, I don’t like that you do this.” Don’t try to be cool. Just express yourself.